Trees & Shrubs

Trees and shrubs are the backbone of the landscape and should be the first things planted in the landscape. Proper selection will enhance a home’s appearance and increase property value while reflecting the homeowner’s style and personality.

Trees and shrubs are the backbone of the landscape and should be the first things planted in the landscape. Proper selection will enhance a home’s appearance and increase property value while reflecting the homeowner’s style and personality. Flowering and non-flowering, needled evergreen and deciduous leaved, blue, green, bronze or chartreuse color, enormous giants and petite ornamentals; many different varieties of trees and shrubs exist and placing the right plant in the right location is essential for success.

Let our trained nursery professionals assist you in selecting the perfect tree or shrub to complete your landscape. We carry a selection that is unmatched in the Kansas City area and are willing and eager to explain our favorites. Improved varieties are introduced each year and we always strive to carry the best and newest – varieties more resistant to disease, shade trees more able to withstand storm damage and ornamentals in unique colors, shapes and sizes you have to see to believe.

Although we try and maintain a good selection of nursery stock yearlong, we pride ourselves on our selection and knowledge of certain plants. Quite simply, we carry varieties of plants that other garden nurseries have never even heard of. We’re plant enthusiasts too, and love to share our own personal experiences with anything in the field.

The catalog may take some time to download as it is a large file - please, be patient!

View our planting guide.

 

 

 

 

Ornamental Trees are grown for their beauty and add that finishing touch to the landscape Ornamental trees can be either evergreen or deciduous and have some striking feature of interest, such as unusual bark, colorful berries, beautiful flowers, striking fall color or an interesting shape.

Shade Trees are the giants of the landscape. Proper selection will enhance a home’s appearance and increase property value while reflecting the homeowner’s style and personality. Let our trained nursery professionals assist you in selecting the perfect tree or shrub to complete your landscape.

Flowering Shrubs add color and texture to the landscape. New, improved varieties are introduced every year and include options for sun or shade.

Here is more about flowering shrubs.

 

Our Favorite Flowering Shrubs

 

Azalea:
A mounded, compact flowering shrub with dark, glossy foliage for the eastern or northern side of the landscape.  A spectacular showing of bright single or double flowers in spring and striking fall color.

 

 

 

Hydrangea:
Commonly known as the shade loving mophead type of flower, new varieties of Hydrangea are tougher and can stand up to our summers even planted in full sun. We carry 30 varieties of Hydrangeas through the growing season and are always happy to show you our new favorites.

Learn more about Hydrangeas.

 

Crapemyrtle:
An eye-catching flowering shrub! Showy blooms all summer on this dramatic, upright shrub for sun.

 

 

 

Lilac:
This extremely fragrant shrub is an old-fashioned favorite. Older varieties can reach heights over 10 feet, however newer dwarf varieties make it possible to enjoy the sweet aroma in almost any sunny spot.

 

 

Roses:

Roses are the “Queens of the Garden” and have been a classic for beauty and fragrance in the garden for hundreds of years.

View our 2014 Rose list.

There are many types of roses – each having different characteristics.

  • Hybrid Tea: This is the traditional cutting rose. Long straight stems with a single flower on top. The most fragrant of all roses.
  • Floribunda: A very hardy cross with hybrid tea-like flowers clustered on each stem. Can range in size from low-growing up to 5 feet
  • Grandiflora: This cross between a Hybrid Tea and a Floribunda produces clustered blooms on long stems. A tough rose that can reach heights up to 7 feet.
  • Climbers: These roses do not actually climb but instead grow super long canes that can be tied to a support.
  • Miniature: A compact rose that is extremely hardy with small perfectly shaped blooms.
  • Shrub: The most popular category of roses for its easy care and heavy blooming. Many newer shrub roses are not grafted but on their own root making them more resistant to insects and disease.
  • David Austin: A type of English rose developed for a strong fragrance on a tougher plant. Known for it’s large “cabbage bloom” flowers.
Tips for Success
  • Lots of Sun! Roses need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight, however they can handle much more
  • Feed…feed...feed! Roses are very heavy feeders. Use a granular, slow release fertilizer, like Family Tree Slow Release or Rose-tone every 3-4 weeks or the Family Tree Nursery water soluble fertilizer once a week.
  • Prevention! Roses are attractive targets for bugs and fungus. Prevent any future problems with an application of a systemic insecticide and fungicide like Bayer All-In-One Rose and Flower Care.
Overwintering

Most roses are grafted – meaning the desirable rose has been grown on a much hardier wild rose stock. The lump at the base of your plant where these two meet is called the bud union. This bud union should be protected from freezing temperatures. Whether you prefer rose cones, collars or simply mounding mulch around the base of the plant, it must be done as soon as the ground freezes. Many gardeners have lost their intended rose only to have a rangy wild rose reappear in its place.

 

Chamaecyparis:
A family of delicate looking, fern-leaf evergreens; ranging in size from ground-hugging varieties to tall, stately giants, and in colors of green, blue or chartreuse.  More familiar to those in the Northwest, Chamaecyparis, or False Cypress, are remarkably adaptable to our climate and provide a unique, almost Asian-like influence to the landscape.

 

 

Broadleaf Evergreens:
A category of Evergreens that do not have the typical needles, like Pines or Spruce, but instead, leaves that stay on through winter, like Holly or Southern Magnolias. Spray Broadleaf Evergreens with an anti-desiccant, like Wilt-stop, each winter to prevent moisture loss.

View our Broadleaf Evergreen care sheet.

 

 

Fruit Trees:
We carry a large variety of fruit trees for your consideration. Your available space is a key factor in what fruit you choose to grow.  Don’t dismiss fruit trees for smaller spaces - most of the trees we carry are semi-dwarf and only grow between 12’ and 15’ at maturity (the most popular sold these days).  Make sure you read the descriptions well, and ask our nursery professionals about the mature size and whether your tree requires a pollinator to set fruit.